Why You Should Not Give IQ Tests to Your Kids

The grounds for avoiding administering IQ testing to children free iq test instant results under the age of eight are persuasive. As Mensa’s Youth & Education Ambassador, I got questions from parents (and grandparents) every day (sometimes with videos) on how to have a young kid evaluated.

1. The results are erratic.

If you test a three-year-old kid and the score is high (say, two standard deviations above the mean or more), the chances of that score being the same six years later are very slim. It’s like playing the IQ lottery. It’s possible, but it shouldn’t be part of your retirement strategy.

The difficulty is that this leaves adults with an insecure score number in their brains, impairing their capacity to make right decisions afterward.

2. Testing is almost never done for the benefit of the kid.

We’ve all heard many stories of two-year-olds becoming members of Mensa and wondered what was going on. IQ testing was typically done as part of a bigger examination when the parent was having the kid assessed for anything else. For example, I had one of my children assessed for speech therapy, and as part of that examination, he received a Woodcock-Johnson.

When a parent wants a child’s IQ evaluated only for educational purposes, the parent must analyze his or her own motivations. Testing should not be carried out on the spur of the moment, for the sake of curiosity, or to prove a point.

3. It doesn’t hit the sweet spot.

IQ testing, like tennis racquets, has a sweet spot. That sweet spot, in my view, is somewhere between seven and twelve years old (others may disagree, and I’m not wedded to this range, I’m just seriously dating it) (others may disagree, and I’m not married to this range, I’m just seriously dating it).

You receive a nice, accurate score in the sweet spot, which helps you to make smart educational selections for the youngster. Ace! Your findings are more difficult to put to good use outside of the sweet area.