Listening To Music Can Relieve Stress

If you are in the middle of your exam period, are you studying for your theory exam or are you busy for a reason other than busy? Do you have the feeling that there should be more in your head than you are getting in right now? So listening to music, singing along… preferably aloud, and together with someone else is absolutely great! Curious why? We explain. If you are interested, visit https://www.hugoandsons.co.uk/.

Alert and focus

Are you busy storing all the information you learn for your exam period or for that important presentation in your overcrowded brain? Then you feel the pressure increase, your heart rate goes up, a substance called cortisol is released. Cortisol is a stress hormone that is intended, among other things, to regain focus. It makes you more alert. That alertness and focus are usually short-lived. Just like in ancient times, that cortisol peak ensured that at the sight of a saber-toothed tiger you knew exactly what to do and could react as quickly as possible. All the energy went to your muscles and you were able to run away at lightning speed. Literally and figuratively! Back to the present; however, such an exam period, or another moment of stress, lasts longer than such a moment of escape. For most exams, you are studying or studying for days. Then you are exposed to more cortisol than intended. Not everybody is happy with that. So how do you get this cortisol level back to normal?

Music helps you relax under stress

We make or listen to music for various reasons. You feel certain emotions, it makes you happy, or nostalgic with a goosebumps moment as a result. The other begins to move spontaneously and does not seem to be able to influence it. Various processes have started in the brain without you realizing it. Countless ‘new’ connections are made, your brain becomes more active and wiser, as it were. But there is one more thing that music can help you with. Music on a certain beat (60 to 70 beats per minute) helps your heart rate return to a basic level, according to various studies. Because this is also your average heart rate when you’re sitting still at your desk. To put on that nice heavy metal, or that new hip-hop song is not so smart while learning, you are then distracted by too much variation in the music. Opt for quiet sounds: ambient sounds of a forest, a waterfall still work well. It’s not for nothing that these are the sounds you hear when you experience a relaxing day in the sauna. There’s even a top ten most relaxing music on Spotify. So put on your headphones and go with that banana!

Singing along with your BFF is also allowed

Have you been staring at your books for hours, with that soothing music playing in the background? Then it’s time for a break, one that gives you energy again. Take a walk outside, the fresh oxygen and moving your body does wonder for your head. In the meantime, put on your favorite playlist and sing along casually. Or invite your best friend to go through the exam material together, after all, two know more than one. And you will find support in each other through that extra hug that you get from her, which is also good for calming down. In the meantime, take some healthy food with you, after all, brains also just need nutrition and hydration.

Why You Should Not Give IQ Tests to Your Kids

The grounds for avoiding administering IQ testing to children free iq test instant results under the age of eight are persuasive. As Mensa’s Youth & Education Ambassador, I got questions from parents (and grandparents) every day (sometimes with videos) on how to have a young kid evaluated.

1. The results are erratic.

If you test a three-year-old kid and the score is high (say, two standard deviations above the mean or more), the chances of that score being the same six years later are very slim. It’s like playing the IQ lottery. It’s possible, but it shouldn’t be part of your retirement strategy.

The difficulty is that this leaves adults with an insecure score number in their brains, impairing their capacity to make right decisions afterward.

2. Testing is almost never done for the benefit of the kid.

We’ve all heard many stories of two-year-olds becoming members of Mensa and wondered what was going on. IQ testing was typically done as part of a bigger examination when the parent was having the kid assessed for anything else. For example, I had one of my children assessed for speech therapy, and as part of that examination, he received a Woodcock-Johnson.

When a parent wants a child’s IQ evaluated only for educational purposes, the parent must analyze his or her own motivations. Testing should not be carried out on the spur of the moment, for the sake of curiosity, or to prove a point.

3. It doesn’t hit the sweet spot.

IQ testing, like tennis racquets, has a sweet spot. That sweet spot, in my view, is somewhere between seven and twelve years old (others may disagree, and I’m not wedded to this range, I’m just seriously dating it) (others may disagree, and I’m not married to this range, I’m just seriously dating it).

You receive a nice, accurate score in the sweet spot, which helps you to make smart educational selections for the youngster. Ace! Your findings are more difficult to put to good use outside of the sweet area.