The Powerful Effect of Music on the Brain

Within the book, the ability of Music, Elena Mannes says, “Scientists have found that music stimulates more parts of the brain than the other human function.” Let’s study a number of the ways music can aid in the healing and stimulation of the human brain.

Pain Reduction
“I think music in itself is healing. It’s an explosive expression of humanity. It’s something we are all touched by. irrespective of what culture we’re from, everyone loves music.” —Billy Joel

The study showed that paying attention to relaxing music of the patient’s choice “reduced pain and increased functional mobility significantly.” Researchers believe that music eases pain because taking note of it triggers opioids—the body’s natural pain relievers. in a very 2013 study, people given the opioid blocking drug Naltrexone experienced less pleasure while being attentive to their favorite song, suggesting music activates the discharge of pain-relieving opioids.

Stress Relief
Depending on the sort of music you hear, relaxing music can alleviate stress by lowering cortisol levels, which is the hormone released in response to worry. A 2013 study demonstrates a link between music and decreased stress in pediatric hospital room patients.

Memory
Studies linking music to memory recall have increased since the first 20th century when the research first emerged. taking note of certain music can take your mind back decades in a moment.

Seizure, Brain Injury, or Stroke
It has been reported that the brains of patients with epilepsy respond differently to music than folks that don’t have epilepsy. “Persons with epilepsy synchronize before a seizure. However, in our study, patients with epilepsy synchronized to the music without having a seizure,” said Christine Charlton, of The Ohio State University Wexner heart. Charlton explained that stress causes seizures to occur and added, “By being attentive to the music, many patients reported that they felt relaxed.”

Stroke patients who listened to music within the early stages after a stroke showed an improvement in recovery in step with a 2008 study. The author of the study, Teppo Särkämö, suggested that patients start being attentive to music soon after the stroke, as many changes occur during the primary weeks and months of recovery.

In 1973 a music-based treatment called Melodic Intonation Therapy was developed to assist stroke survivors or those that suffer from aphasia to be ready to communicate again. the aim of the therapy is to convert singing into speech. in keeping with Research and Hope, while these patients aren’t able to speak, “they are often ready to sing, sometimes with the identical fluency and clarity that they had before the onset of illness.”